Embracing a Feminine Shabby Chic Style

Source from Decoist

A warm, feminine style which is also referred to as country cottage or French Antique, Shabby Chic has a rather romantic air. It’s all about blushing pink shades, roses and a certain simplicity in the sense that any vases, mirrors and chairs tend to be vintage rather than new. Because of this they have a trademark distressed look (whether genuine or applied).

The colour scheme with this look is neutral whites, beiges, creams and pale pastels such as blue, green, yellow and pink. There are plenty of florals, with fussy frills and polka dots encouraged (it’s a feminine style, after all). A great proponent of the shabby chic style is the designer Cath Kidson.

Fancy candlesticks, ornately framed mirrors, pitchers with wild flowers placed on a dressing table – these are all shabby chic accessories. In terms of furniture, reclaimed wood – often painted white – is popular and so too is the odd Louis IV reproduction chair with chipped paint. Sofas tend to be covered in throws and cushions (it’s all about comfort but without the elegance of Scandinavian style).

Wicker, linen and natural cotton, as well as the more glamorous velvet are favourite Shabby Chic materials from which to fashion tablecloths, curtains, cushions and other matching accessories.

This is a style that’s perfect for a female-led interior, but one which men can find a bit questionable at times.

Get Serious with Scandinavian Style

Source from Aestatestudio

A look that first became popular in the Scandinavian and Nordic countries of Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Finland in the mid-30s, this is a style which, like Modernism, embraces minimalism and simplicity. But it’s done in a very elegant fashion. You’ll understand exactly what we mean when you realise three of its famous founders were Arne Jacobsen, Hans Wegner and Verner Panton (all produced iconic accent chairs revered today).

A neutral colour scheme is key, usually white, with the odd splash of colour in the form of cushions or a painting. Another big tenet of this style is natural materials; the more from your immediate environment the better, especially woods, leather, wool and even fur (more likely faux fur these days) because Scandi style tends to be cosy – especially in winter with roaring wood fires and plenty of fairy lights.

Flooring tends to be either wide planks of reclaimed wood or concrete. There isn’t a lot of furniture but what there is tends to be functional and of high quality, usually simply but carefully-carved timber and designed in such a way to showcase the natural beauty of the wood.

Nothing in this design style is elaborate or overly-fussy – something that many busy homeowners these days will certainly appreciate.